I recently stumbled upon a blog that would instantly get the Grandpa Bob stamp of approval: FOUND by National Geographic.

FOUND showcases a collection of historical photographs that have been stored at the National Geographic Archives in Washington, D.C.  In celebration of the magazine’s 125th anniversary, National Geographic and it’s curator, William Bonner, will be posting images on their blog that will make your jaw drop!  Many of these images have never been published nor seen by the general public…until now!

Below is a very small sample of National Geographic‘s collection of historical images.  The picture descriptions are courtesy of FOUND.  You can click on each picture below to view them as well as more beautiful images in their new home:

A female musher participates in a dog sled race through Nome, Alaska, March 1919. Read January’s “Into the Unknown” for an in-depth experience of what dog sledding exploration was like in the early 1900s.Photograph by Thomas A. Ross, National Geographic

A female musher participates in a dog sled race through Nome, Alaska, March 1919. Read January’s “Into the Unknown” for an in-depth experience of what dog sledding exploration was like in the early 1900s.
Photograph by Thomas A. Ross, National Geographic

 

Former soldiers study cake decorating at a vocational school in Puerto Rico, April 1951.Photograph by Justin Locke, National Geographic

Former soldiers study cake decorating at a vocational school in Puerto Rico, April 1951.
Photograph by Justin Locke, National Geographic

 

Teenagers run and play on large white sand dunes in New Mexico, 1957.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

Teenagers run and play on large white sand dunes in New Mexico, 1957.
Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

 

Cars parked at a drive-in theater with a 53-foot wide screen in Alexandria, Virginia, December 1941.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

Cars parked at a drive-in theater with a 53-foot wide screen in Alexandria, Virginia, December 1941.
Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

 

A close-up portrait of a coal miner in Omar, West Virginia, 1938.Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart, National Geographic

A close-up portrait of a coal miner in Omar, West Virginia, 1938.
Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart, National Geographic

The goal is to give these treasured images the wide audience they deserve.  National Geographic also hopes to reach people who might have more information on certain images that have lost their original dates or locations. 

One of the many lessons that Grandpa Bob taught me is that we can not move forward in life without learning about and appreciating our past.  I can not think of a better way to do just that than by clicking here to check out FOUND by National Geographic!

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